The emerging science of virtue. – Fowers, B. J., Carroll, J. S., Leonhardt, N. D., & Cokelet, B. (2020)

Abstract: Numerous scholars have claimed that positive ethical traits such as virtues are important in human psychology and behavior. Psychologists have begun to test these claims. The scores of studies on virtue do not yet constitute a mature science of virtue because of unresolved theoretical and methods challenges. In this article, we addressed those challengesContinue reading “The emerging science of virtue. – Fowers, B. J., Carroll, J. S., Leonhardt, N. D., & Cokelet, B. (2020)”

Social science as an inherently moral endeavor. – Fowers, B. J. (2020).

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to argue that social science is an inherently moral enterprise. There are four reasons to see science as a moral endeavor based on the neo-Aristotelian recognition that morality is centered on human goods (e.g., justice and knowledge), not just right action. First, science is guided by epistemic valuesContinue reading “Social science as an inherently moral endeavor. – Fowers, B. J. (2020).”

A daily diary study of lifestyle behaviors, psychological distress, and well-being. – Anderson, A. R., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).

Abstract: Many lifestyle behaviors such as diet, exercise, and sleep are related to physical and mental health. However, very little research has been done on the day-to-day influence of these activities on both psychological distress (PD) and more holistic conceptions of overall well-being. This study seeks to investigate the patterns of common lifestyle behaviors andContinue reading “A daily diary study of lifestyle behaviors, psychological distress, and well-being. – Anderson, A. R., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).”

An Aristotelian analysis of the structure of human action. – Fowers, B. J. (2015).

Abstract: Unavailable Link: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/book/10.1002/9781118748213#page=83 Citation: Fowers, B. J. (2015). An Aristotelian analysis of the structure of human action. In J. Martin, J. Sugarman, & K. Slaney (Eds.), The Wiley handbook of theoretical and philosophical psychology: Methods, approaches and new directions for social science, (pp. 70-84). Wiley and Sons.

A goal theoretic framework for screen-time monitoring behavior. – Owenz, M. B., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).

Abstract: Children’s screen time (i.e., time spent using computers, televisions, mobile devices) has rapidly increased with the development of mobile technology, and this increase has become a matter of serious concern for teachers, parents, family life educators, psychologists, and other health professionals. High usage rates (more than 2 hours per day) have been associated withContinue reading “A goal theoretic framework for screen-time monitoring behavior. – Owenz, M. B., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).”

A shared understanding of purposeful caregiving: Reply to Hill, Wynn, and Carpenter (2020) – Lang, S. F., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).

Abstract: Replies to comments made by P. L. Hill, M. J. Wynn, and B. D. Carpenter (see record 2019-81943-006) on the original article by S. F. Lang and B. J. Fowers (see record 2018-24691-001). Hill, Wynn, and Carpenter’s (2020) discussion of Alzheimer’s caregiving being motivated by purposeful engagement is a welcome perspective. Their views areContinue reading “A shared understanding of purposeful caregiving: Reply to Hill, Wynn, and Carpenter (2020) – Lang, S. F., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).”

An exploratory study of friendship characteristics and their relations with hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. – Anderson, A. R., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).

Abstract: Friendships are an important source of happiness, well-being, physical health, and longevity. Researchers have often linked unidimensional friendship quality to life satisfaction and positive affect, which are hedonic forms of well-being. Aristotle presented an expanded view of friendship with three general characteristics: Utility, Pleasure, and Virtue. Following his theory, we expected Pleasure and UtilityContinue reading “An exploratory study of friendship characteristics and their relations with hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. – Anderson, A. R., & Fowers, B. J. (2020).”

An expanded theory of Alzheimer’s caregiving. – Lang, S. F., & Fowers, B. J. (2019).

Abstract: The ancient and cross-culturally prevalent pattern of caregiving suggests that long-term caregiving is species characteristic for humans. If so, then an evolutionary account of the adaptation(s) that underwrite this caregiving is necessary, particularly for the one-sided and long-term nature of Alzheimer’s caregiving. Four standard evolutionary explanations are evaluated: kin selection theory, the grandmother hypothesis,Continue reading “An expanded theory of Alzheimer’s caregiving. – Lang, S. F., & Fowers, B. J. (2019).”

Realistic virtues and how to study them: Introducing the STRIVE-4 model. – Cokelet, B., & Fowers, B. J. (2019).

Abstract: This article argues that ordinary virtue trait attributions presuppose the existence of realistic traits that fall short of, for example, Aristotelian ideals and that debate about the existence of virtue traits should be reoriented in the light of this fact. After clarifying and motivating that basic thesis, we discuss what the existing psychological researchContinue reading “Realistic virtues and how to study them: Introducing the STRIVE-4 model. – Cokelet, B., & Fowers, B. J. (2019).”

On properly characterizing moral agency. – Fowers, B. J., Anderson, A. R., & Lang, S. F. (2018)

Abstract: Doris (2015b) develops a theory of moral agency to avoid a skeptical challenge arising from psychology studies indicating that (im)moral behavior is caused by trivial situational factors. His theory is flawed in attending only to situational influences on behavior and neglecting individual differences such as moral identity and virtue. A focus on individual differencesContinue reading “On properly characterizing moral agency. – Fowers, B. J., Anderson, A. R., & Lang, S. F. (2018)”